Charleston County, South Carolina News

Charleston County hires first female county administrator

Charleston County Council has hired its first female county administrator.

Charleston County marks 9-1-1 education month

The outcome of any 911 call lies partly in the hands of unseen emergency dispatchers and call-takers — who will be honored during Charleston County’s National Telecommunicator Week April 9-15 within its month-long public awareness campaign.

Charleston County marks Earth Day at Riverfront Park

County residents can collectively celebrate Earth Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. today at North Charleston’s Riverfront Park, the jurisdiction’s 18th annual popular observance of a worldwide day dedicated to environmental awareness.

Deadline set for Charleston County boards and commissions openings

A Monday deadline has been set for those interested in applying for vacancies on some Charleston County boards and commissions.

Public input sought on preliminary flood map plan

Charleston County residents will have the opportunity to view new, preliminary flood maps and ask questions about potential impacts to their property, during a series of scheduled meetings that begin Monday.

Crucial SC infrastructure bank board meeting on I-526 extension looms

A decision on whether to release state funds for a major road extension through the center of Charleston County could be made as early as next week.

In Review: Legacy of the half cent sales tax

During the past six months, Palmetto Business Daily has featured a regular series that outlines some of the impacts of the initial half cent sales tax passed by Charleston County voters in 2004.

Balance needed but greater housing density important: expert

Balance is needed to preserve the character of a Charleston while encouraging economic development, a leading thinker on innovation and urban planning said.

Legacy of the half-cent: Boost in funding puts Charleston County at head of bike-friendly trend

When voters in Charleston County passed a half-cent sales tax increase in 2004, bike and pedestrian paths weren’t popular, Deputy Administrator of Transportation and Public Works Jim Armstrong said recently.

Metro Business Network